Mom and Dad (1945)

Also known as ‘The Family Story’ in the UK, this film is about a naïve young woman who ‘gets into trouble’ because her parents had kept her ignorant of the facts of life.

Apparently this film was very successful upon release. For the life of me I can’t understand why, because it seems to be a film which had achieved a massive advertising potential to make it seem very shocking and scandalous, while not living up to the hype. After all, apparently it was shown to gender segregated audiences and upon viewing it I realized it was nothing more than a health education film padded out with a flimsy story. There was even a short scene afterward in which the audience were instructed to clap! No thanks, mister. I think I’ll pass on that one.

Or perhaps my scoffing reaction to it stems from being in a society which is far more open about that sort of thing (sex education and sex, not clapping. I don’t think we’re that backward a society). The girl’s naiveté was quite shocking, but in a modern society where google is only a click away, it is rather pitiful. The modern system still has flaws but at least all pregnant girls aren’t forced to wear a scarlet letter for the rest of their lives.

I know that not all mothers are understanding when it comes to teaching their daughters about the ins and outs of growing up, but the mother was too much of a caricature to be believable. She was obviously always running back to her women’s committee whenever anything went wrong. She was practically apoplectic when she saw a group of people sharing a drink on a train. Damn those trains. You’ll lose your morals on ’em!

The sex ed talks for both genders filled up the last half of the story, and it was probably likely that the novelty of seeing a live birth was what sold the tickets. Whatever floats your boat, I guess. However, this film is one I don’t really need to watch again. Or want to, for that matter.

MY RATING: * / *****

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s